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Beyond The Weight Room With Melissa Leier: Find Your Fitness Personality

Now that we’re a few months into the New Year, if you have committed to new fitness practices, you’re likely either enjoying new activities while planning to keep on going with what you’ve started or you are struggling to keep doing what you committed to and wondering where that crazy idea came from in the first place! For many, that’s often the case after trying something new. If it’s not the right fit for you, you may give up due to frustration, boredom, difficulty or lack of enjoyment.

The American College of Sports Medicine suggests that both exercisers and trainers can align fitness regimens with personality types to best structure a lasting routine and recognize pitfalls. Figure out what drives you and use that knowledge to help you stick to it and enjoy it. The key to thriving in those fitness challenges you set for yourself toward long-term goals is to find your fit and work with your personality, rather than against it. For example, consider if you like consistency in your day to day or prefer an ever-changing environment? Do you work best with specific goals set or do you like to go with the flow? Are you an early riser getting your obligations out of the way first thing or are you more spontaneous, taking opportunities to be active as they arise or at random times during the day? First things first, what is your personality?

Meet The Personal Trainers: Jamie Polson

Meet the Personal Trainers: Jamie Polson.

Jamie's interest in health and fitness began as a young teenager.  He has devoted many hours and energy to improving his overall health, wellness and physique; and takes pride in sharing his knowledge with his friends and clients to help them achieve their goals and enjoy life. Jamie is very serious about train; not only his own training, but those who he trains as well.  He has a respect for hard work and believe if a person is going to embark on a path towards a goal it should be done right, without cutting corners and honestly.  Over the course of 25 years, he has amassed the experience along with certifications in fitness and nutrition.  From beginner to a well seasoned weight lifter, Jamie has the tools to help you exceed your weight management goals.

Jamie specializes in Individual Dietary Plans, Customized Fitness and Workout Programs, Weight Management and Lean Muscle Tissue Growth.  His qualifications include: Fitness and Nutrition Diploma and over 25 years in health and fitness 

You can contact Jamie directly by email at jamie@teamwawryk.com

What is The Best Time To Workout?

Questions from around the gym, here are your answers!

If you have trouble with consistency, morning may be your best time to exercise, experts say.

“Research suggests in terms of performing a consistent exercise habit, individuals who exercise in the morning tend to do better,” says Cedric Bryant, PhD, chief science officer with the American Council on Exercise in San Diego.

“The thinking is that they get their exercise in before other time pressures interfere,” Bryant says. “I usually exercise at 6 a.m., because no matter how well-intentioned I am, if I don’t exercise in the morning, other things will squeeze it out.”

He recommends that if you exercise in the morning, when body temperature is lower, you should allow more time to warm up than you would later in the day.

  1. Exercising early in the morning “jump starts” your metabolism, keeping it elevated for hours, sometimes for up to 24 hours! As a result, you’ll be burning more calories all day long—just because you exercised in the morning.
     
  2. Exercising in the morning energizes you for the day—not to mention that gratifying feeling of virtue you have knowing you’ve done something disciplined and good for you. (Much better than a worm!)
     
  3. Studies have shown that exercise significantly increases mental acuity—a benefit that lasts four to ten hours after your workout ends. Exercising in the a.m. means you get to harness that brainpower, instead of wasting it while you’re snoozing.
     
  4. Assuming you make exercise a true priority, it shouldn’t be a major problem to get up 30 to 60 minutes earlier—especially since regular exercise generally means a higher quality of sleep, which in turn means you’ll probably require less sleep. (If getting up 30 to 60 minutes earlier each day seems too daunting, you can ease into it with 10 to 20 minutes at first.)
     
  5. When you exercise at about the same time every morning—especially if you wake up regularly at about the same time—you’re regulating your body’s endocrine system and circadian rhythms. Your body learns that you do the same thing just about every day, and it begins to prepare for waking and exercise several hours before you actually open your eyes. That’s beneficial because:
    • Your body’s not “confused” by wildly changing wake-up times, which means waking up is much less painful. (You may even find that you don’t need an alarm clock most days.)
    • Hormones prepare your body for exercise by regulating blood pressure, heart rate, blood flow to muscles, etc.
    • Your metabolism, along with all the hormones involved in activity and exercise, begin to elevate while you’re sleeping. As a result, you’ll feel more alert, energized, and ready to exercise when you do wake up.
  6.  Many people find that morning exercise has a tendency to regulate their appetite for the rest of the day. Not only do they eat less (since activity causes the release of endorphins, which in turn diminishes appetite), they also choose healthier portions of healthier foods.
     
  7. People who consistently exercise find, sometimes to their great surprise, that the appointed time every morning evolves into something they look forward to. Besides the satisfaction of taking care of themselves, they find it’s a great time to plan their day, pray, or just think more clearly—things most of us often don’t get to do otherwise.
     
  8. Exercising first thing in the morning is the most foolproof way to ensure that other things don’t overtake your fitness commitment, particularly if you have a hectic family life. (It’s so easy to wimp out in the evening, when we’re tired or faced with such tasks as rustling up dinner and helping with homework.)
     
  9. More than 90% of those who exercise consistently have a morning fitness routine. If you want to exercise on a regular basis, the odds are in your favor if you squeeze your workout into the a.m.
     
  10. Non-morning people can always trick themselves in the a.m. Having trouble psyching yourself up for a sunrise jog? Do what I did—tell yourself that you’ll still be so fast asleep that you won’t even remember—much less mind!

Found at http://fatmandreaming.tumblr.com

Fitness Focus is Saskatoon's No Contract Gym

Weight Training Myths

Many myths exist in weight training, and conventional wisdom can sometimes take you far off track from your goals in the gym.  For example, training with weights will make you oversized and inflexible or if you train with heavy weights will make you heavy and slow wheather you are a man or woman; or that squatting below parallel will lead to nothing but injuries.  None of these statements are completely truthful.  Training regularly in a shortened range of motion will likely keep you a lot less flexible or bouncing your body through the bottom of a full squat leads to a good possibility of injuring yourself.  Weight training performed in proper and an appropriate manner could likely put these myths to rest.

Full Range of Motion?

A common area that people neglect or misunderstand is Range of Motion and how it can be related to injury prevention (ROM, the full range that a weight is moved from the bottom of the exercise to the top). It depends on the individual and the particular joint, but for the most part, you should practice moving through the full ROM; the way our joints are designed to move. Most people don't appreciate how powerful a tool weight training can be to increase flexibility.  Olympic weight lifters are the second most flexible athlete next to the olympic gymnast.  But weight training can also be a powerful tool to decrease flexibility; when you take the traditional muscle-bound bodybuilder type who constantly trains with shortened range of motion.

by John Catanzaro
www.fitnet.ca/

 

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Fitness Focus
1250 Ontario Ave
Saskatoon, SK S7K 1S5
Ph: 306.244.6413

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Monday - Thursday: 5am - 11pm
Friday: 5am - 10pm
Saturday: 8am - 8pm
Sunday: 8am - 8pm